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Edible Gardening

Hybridized or Genetically Modified?

'Fuyu' Japanese Persimmon

Picking persimmons, November 26, 2012

Here I am on November 28th (note the fashionable cast) picking the last persimmons off my ‘Fuyu’ Japanese persimmon tree. Big, sweet, seedless, never bitter, super delicious fruit grown to perfection without an ounce of pesticide, fungicide or chemical fertilizers of any kind. A very cool tree too, with fruits hanging on like Christmas ornaments.  Only 3 years old,  it produced about 50 large persimmons – a strong ROI given that grocers sell these for $2 each!

This persimmon variety was produced ages ago through cross pollination and natural selection, the tradititional way new varieties of plants come about. Many of our largest food crops today are Genetically Modified (GM) or Genetically Engineered (GE), new plants that could NEVER be created outside of biotech lab. It is funny to think about jellyfish genes that light up pigs’ noses in the dark, arctic fish genes that give cold tolerance to strawberries, potatoes that glow in the dark when they need watering, and corn that cannot be killed with gallons of Round-up. These foods were engineered to be better, safer, feed more people, but that has NOT been the case!

The website below explains why there is such an uproar about genetically modified foods, why these pose a serious health risk, and provides a shopping list to help you avoid the 9 GM food crops (found in everything).   Genetically Modified Foods

Read more about the health effects on Dr. Elizabeth Vaughan’s October blog:  Dr. V’s Blog.  Yes, it is eye-opening!

My 2013 gardening classes starting in February, will take you way beyond “Gardening 101” with a focus on Organic Gardening.  It is surprising that even the University Extension Service Consumer Horticulture (Master Gardener)programs have not caught up!  Even if you do not want to grown your own edibles, the info above may change how you shop.  There are excellent local sources of organically grown produce in the NC piedmont.

Live well. Be happy.    Ellen

My 17 lb basket of persimmons!

 

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